ENGLISH

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The English Faculty strives to develop young people who have a global awareness, an ability to think creatively and critically and to foster a love of both reading and writing in all students.

The staff has developed a vigorous curriculum that exposes students to a wide range of contemporary and classic texts that relate to current issues within society as well as opportunities for student choice as it provides students with the skills to express themselves confidently and passionately in both written and spoken forms.

Year 7

The Year 7 English course strives to develop globally aware students, capable of responding creatively and critically to a range of different texts. Students complete a range of tasks, including oral presentations, analytical responses, creative responses and comparative responses these thinking skills.

Unit 1 – Students distinguish between fiction and non-fiction texts before constructing their own autobiographical or biographical texts. Students complete a text study on the text, Boy Overboard, exploring what it means to be a refugee and analysing the context of Afghanistan. Students participate in an interactive program ‘Passages’, which provides them with an opportunity to “experience” some of the difficulties an asylum seeker experiences in the hopes of creating empathetic young people before students create a recommendation for the Australian government’s immigration policy.

Unit 2 – Students explore a variety of short texts including contemporary music and poetry as they develop their understanding of language and how it can influence an audience. They construct a presentation raising awareness for a campaign using a lyric of their choosing.

Unit 3 –
Students complete a text study on the novel, Percy Jackson and the lightning thief. They are required to identify key themes and ideas shown in the novel, including the impact of learning disabilities on self-esteem and identity, what it means to be a hero and the importance of friendship. Students also study the myths and legends from Ancient Greece, constructing modern comic representations of the ancient stories.

Unit 4 – Students study the horror genre, learning the conventions of horror including setting, characterisation, events and language structures. Using this knowledge, students construct their own script detailing a ghost-trail or a narrative. Students also watch the films Monster House and Coraline before creating a comparative analysis as they explore how different directors approach the same genre.

Students participate in a reading program throughout the year, engaging in 10 minutes of reading at the start of all classes. Students are explicitly taught a range of comprehension strategies to assist with the development of their reading skills and keep a reader’s notebook detailing these strategies to assist them as they encounter new and challenging texts. All students are enrolled in the Premier’s Reading Program to promote a love of reading.

Year 8

The Year 8 English course strives to develop globally aware students, capable of responding creatively and critically to a range of different texts. Students complete a range of tasks, including oral presentations, analytical responses, creative responses and comparative responses to develop these thinking skills.

Unit 1 – Students develop their understanding of nonfiction and hybrid texts as they respond to two short texts; Hana’s Suitcase and Sadako and the thousand paper cranes. Students explore the impacts of World War II on different groups within Europe as they follow the true story of Hana. Students will attend the Immigration Museum as they explore how suitcases of belongings can represent a person’s identity and sense of self. Students compare this knowledge to the impact of World War II on Australia and Japan as they read the true story of Sadako before addressing the social question of whether conflict is ever the best option.

Unit 2 – Students explore a variety of persuasive and media texts as they develop a sophisticated understanding of language and how it changes depending on purpose, text and audience. Students will develop oral presentations to convince audience’s to agree with their stance. Students will then explore different narrative styles as they develop a writing folio with different text types and genres.

Unit 3 – Students complete a film study on The Lion King. They are required to develop a knowledge of film devices as they explore how visuals can transmit meaning. Students use the film to develop their own texts for authentic purposes including the construction of a gameboard inspired by the film.

Unit 4 – Students read and respond to the text, The Giver, as they explore and distinguish between utopian and dystopian societies. Drawing on their knowledge of civics and citizenship, students distinguish what makes a perfect world and explore different leadership styles. Students also explore the power of language as they replicate text structures in their own original text.

Students participate in a reading program throughout the year, engaging in 10 minutes of reading at the start of all classes. Students are explicitly taught a range of comprehension strategies to assist with the development of their reading skills and keep a reader’s notebook detailing these strategies to assist them as they encounter new and challenging texts.

Extension and Support

Students learning English as an Additional Language are provided with additional support to assist with their understanding of the English language within the classroom. The course focuses on developing reading, writing and listening skills and increasing familiarity with a variety of different styles of text. Students are encouraged to develop literacy in their first language alongside their development of the English language. Students also participate in a variety of aural tasks to improve and develop their verbal communication skills and listening skills.